Picasso 1932 – Love, Fame, Tragedy Exhibition (Tate Modern)

Picasso 1932 opened under the alternative name of Picasso 1932. Année érotique (trans. erotic year) at the Musée national Picasso, in Paris, on October 10, 2017. This is a more straight forward analysis of the artworks than the name given to the exhibition when it opened at the Tate Modern, London, on March 8, 2018, though, ‘Love, Fame, Tragedy’ is certainly the underlying context of Picasso’s année érotique.

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Giacometti Exhibition (Tate Modern)

The Giacometti retrospective is a collaboration between Tate Modern and the Fondation Alberto et Annette Giacometti, Paris. This is a unique and exciting opportunity to see rare and previously unseen works by the celebrated Giacometti, an artist who has been extensively written about, linked to the Surrealist movement, and yet still somehow overshadowed.

Paul Nash Exhibition (Tate, SCVA & Laing)

The Paul Nash exhibition from Tate Britain opened at the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts (SCVA), April 8, 2017. With 80% of the original exhibition installed, the mild fragrance of fresh paint still in the air, and the deep purple walls of the first room, ‘We Are Making a New World’ evoked emotions from the moment you entered the Crescent Wing.

Alphonse Mucha: In Quest of Beauty (Exhibition)

In Quest of Beauty

In Quest of Beauty is an exhibition which is designed to not only promote the work of Alphonse Mucha, but to study the theoretical idea of ‘beauty’ that was a core principle of Mucha’s art. In Quest of Beauty is an exhibition specifically looking at Mucha's Paris period and his art work after he returned to his native Czechoslovakia. Critical reviewers largely concur that the exhibition experience mirrors the motif of the exhibition: beauty, and what this meant to Mucha.

Masters of Japanese Photography (SCVA Exhibition)

Masters of Japanese Photography

Masters of Japanese Photography is an exhibition that teaches us about Japanese Culture through the eyes of three photographers who grew up in the aftermath of the Second World War, Nobuyoshi Araki, Eikoe Hosoe, and Kikuji Kawada. The pictures depict personal and cultural experiences, and attempts to educate us in both the ‘natural beauty and social complexity’ of Japan. With this context in mind, it certainly delivers, but to get the full experience of this retrospective, and to understand it, the viewer needs to be open minded.